Project Haruhi
12Nov/171

Bakacast #348 – Skulls for the Skull Car

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On this episode of Bakacast, we start off with a listener question that tasks us with deciding Netflix's anime production plans that prompts us to dig deep for both obvious and obscure choices. We also add Inuyashiki to our watch list, a show that has two very strong intro episodes but still gives us a little pause due to, you know, it being written by Hiroya Oku, the dude who also made the infamous Gantz. Meanwhile, Garo impresses, Whales disappoint, and Kino's Journey sparks a discussion about the value of different adaptation styles.

  • 02:22 - Listener email
  • 20:48 - Children of the Whales 2 - 3
  • 28:07 - Kino's Journey 2
  • 34:12 - The Ancient Magus' Bride 2 - 3
  • 45:09 - Shoukoku no Altair 14 - 15
  • 56:30 - Blood Blockade Battlefront & Beyond 1
  • 1:08:47 - Juuni Taisen 3 - 4
  • 1:13:45 - Garo: Vanishing Line 2 - 3
  • 1:26:00 - Inuyashiki 1 - 2
  • 1:41:15 - Listener comments

About Shamisen

Shamisen is the site owner, administrator, and basically the guy responsible for keeping this place running. His interests include aviation and anime. He is perpetually in a strange mood…

  • Dayriff

    Comments/Questions:

    Blood Blockade Battlefront – Something I’ve found interesting are the hints that Klaus plays kind of a Nick Fury role in Libra. That is, his personal integrity is what keeps an organization that could easily go off the rails (a secret society of supermen enforcing ‘justice’?) actually doing good.

    Juuni Taisen – I dropped it after episode 5 when it became apparent that all the characters are going to die in reverse chinese zodiac order. Maybe I’ll check back in at the finale to see how it all ends up.

    So this is a question for Ben. Sorry if it’s too personal or anything- please ignore if you don’t want to answer. I’ve noticed that when you’re reviewing episodes on the podcast, you often start stuttering. That is, repeating the same first few words of your thought several times until you’re finally able to complete the point you want to make. Is that something you deal with in everyday life, or does it only emerge when you’re trying to talk on a podcast and know you’re speaking to a large audience?